Cell disorder found in women with PMDD makes them different to women with PMS on a molecular level.

Scientific breakthrough raises questions about chemicals, plastics, food additives and everyday toxins that could be affecting women at a reproductive age.

Scientific research has uncovered that women with PMDD are different on a genetic and molecular level to those with PMS finding that a ‘cellular disorder’ may be the cause. NIH researchers found a sex hormone-sensitive gene complex linked to PreMenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD).

I’m not a scientist but as a woman with PMDD I now wonder if this condition is caused by a natural abnormality or are genetically modified foods, the use of plastics and toxic chemicals in the air we breath to the food we eat, combined with preservatives and food additives in processed foods modifying our women’s cellular & molecular structure, particuarly those at a reproductive age?  What about alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking?

Science has long experimented with animals finding that toxic chemicals affect the reproductive systems of females, their offspring and future generations.  These new  findings warrant further research.

We all know that the best approach to eating healthy is eating natural and organic.  Simply because of the amount of chemicals in food which includes pestiscides is dangerous to everyone but more so for those who are less tolerant.  Asthmatics come to mind.

The problem is that we live in a fast paced working society with convenience food readily available.  This has become a major industry in western society that was quickly adopted into the culture.

I recommend the following reading for those who have PMDD  to understand how it affects our relationships. Written by a woman who has experienced life with PMDD and the harm it can do to relationships.

Sandra. C.

PMDD – My Mental Health Nightmare

Sandra writes about her experience with PMDD hoping to raise awareness and break the stigma.

PMDD GIRL
After having my first child at 39 years of age, the bouts of monthly depression (PMDD) Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder were slowly becoming worse.

By the time my daughter was 7 years old I was diagnosed as being peri-menopausal by a nurse at a local clinic.  Around this time my symptoms began to explode into overdrive.

The anger during the 14 days of ovulation became all out rage and it was scary!

Seeing a specialist, I was put on a birth control pill, cutting out the sugar tablets to stop my period and to stop what happens to my brain during ovulation. The doctor recommended that I take an anti-depressant as well.  Taking a few months to have a good effect on me I was beginning to function normally for the first time. The treatment was working and I couldn’t be happier.

Some of the symptoms may appear every now and again in very minor doses that I can cope with.  One of the major positives is that there’s no longer any sign of anger.

Below are symptoms that appear randomly.

  • Mood swings
  • Migraines
  • Tension and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Hopelessness
  • Self esteem issues
  • Marked anger, increased interpersonal conflicts
  • Tension and anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Lack of interest in usual activities
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Fatigue

In sharing my story I’m hoping to break the stigma by raising awareness of PMDD which has been described as PMS on steroids.

I began a page on Facebook for women in Australia who have or suspect they might have PMDD.   PMDD AUSTRALIAN WOMEN’S GROUP

As part of my treatment counselling has helped me to come to terms with what I was facing. I learned to forgive myself and live life to the fullest.  I highly recommend counselling for any woman going through this.  It’s a nightmare and you shouldn’t have to go through it alone!

For Free 24 hour emergency and crisis counselling contact LIFELINE on  13 11 14